The Advance Placement Biology course gives students the opportunity to pursue college level biology studies and credit while still in high school. This course culminated in the AP Biology exam, which can result in the awarding of university credit. The course follows College Board Advanced Placement guidelines and is divided into three main content areas, Molecules and Cells, 
Heredity and Evolution, and Organisms and Populations. This course differs from the Honors Biology by the depth and speed which topics are covered. Experimentation and data analysis are important complements to all concepts. The approach to biology is one of guided reasoning based on observation and experimentation. An array of hands-on activities, research projects, and 
laboratories that develop inquiry skills and conceptual understanding are incorporated into the class.

CP Biology
This introductory course integrates the major concepts of biology. Content areas include evolution, the diversity of life, genetic continuity, organism-environment interactions, the biological roots of behavior, the relationship between structure and function, homeostasis, science as inquiry, science and society, and the history of  biological concepts.  The approach to biology is one of guided reasoning based on observation and experimentation.  An array of hands-on activities and laboratories that develop inquiry skills and conceptual understanding are incorporated into the class.

Honors Biology
This course is designed for advanced students who have excelled in science. The major concepts are organized into a molecular biology framework.  Content areas include bioenergetics, structure and function of cells, genetics, evolution, regulation and homeostasis, and interactions of organisms with their environment.  The approach to biology is one of guided reasoning based on observation and experimentation. An array of hands-on activities, research projects, and laboratories that develop inquiry skills and conceptual understanding are incorporated into the class. Upon completion of this course, students are prepared to take AP Biology the following year.
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This course serves as an introduction to and covers broad aspects of environmental science and environmental studies. The course evaluates natural environmental processes as well as human impacts to these processes. Students are able to examine the effects associated with growth in a developing world; environmental impact of population growth on natural resources; mineral an resource extraction; water resource uses; and renewable and non-renewable sources of power generation. Students consider sustainability issues in general. Emphasis is placed on a holistic approach to environmental science using, environmental surveys, field trip, and class discussions to reinforce scientific principles.

Honors Chemistry is offered in odd years; AP Chemistry in even years.
Pre-requisite: Teacher recommendation, 90%+ weighted average in previous science course, department head approval, and summer assignment.
A particularly noteworthy area of this program is the development of the variety of problem-solving skills and the critical thinking process. Students are encouraged to think about the method of solution to problems rather than to mechanically apply a formula to produce an answer. Mastery of the concepts of chemistry in conjunction with the ability to analyze, evaluate, and reason is what this course demands.
This course differs from the Chemistry I course in the depth, speed, and research projects in which topics are covered and perform a thorough investigation of organic chemistry and biochemistry. A variety of laboratories, research projects and hands-on activities are used to develop critical thinking and analysis skills. Upon completion of this course, students are prepared to take AP Chemistry.


This course is designed to get you thinking about how to go about understanding the world around you.

We will be investigating the nature of motion, forces and energy this semester. In the course of those investigations, we’ll learn a bit about statistics, measurement, mathematical modeling, scientific notation, and practice our basic algebra. We will be investigating how things move by playing with all sorts of fun toys including high frame-rate video cameras, force sensors, balls, and anything else that contributes to understanding.